Our Moon Tincture is a blend of Motherwort, DongQuai, Crampbark, Chasteberry, and Nettle. Our customers have told us it works great during monthly cycle                               

Dong Quai is a popular Chinese remedy, traditionally used to support women's health. Clinical trials have shown little efficacy when dong quai is taken alone, but have indeed shown benefit when combined with other herbs. When combined with Sophora flavescens, dong quai has exhibited both anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory activity.

Motherwort is a mint with dull green, hairy leaves and an intensely bitter taste. The botanical name Leonurus refers to a fanciful resemblance of the leaves to a lion's tale. One rather odd Hindu tale relates that if you make a tea of motherwort and add it to the laundry when you wash your socks and underwear, you will bring peace to your home.                                                                Cramp bark is a large deciduous shrub growing as much as 15 feet (5 m) tall and 15 feet wide. It is native to the moist lowland forests of England and Scotland and naturalized to moist forests of the northern United States and southern Canada. The bark is stripped before the leaves change color in the fall, or before the buds open in the spring. A member of the honeysuckle family, cramp bark bears large white flowers, up to 5 inches (12 cm) across that yield red berries in the fall. The berries are eaten like cranberries, although moderation is recommended. Historically, the berries, once dried, have been used for making ink.                                   For centuries, chasteberry has been used to treat many hormone-related gynecologic conditions. The current literature supports the use of chasteberry for cyclical breast discomfort and premenstrual syndrome; data on its use for menstrual irregularities and fertility disorders are weak. Its traditional use as a galactagogue (i.e., a substance that enhances breast milk production) is not well supported in the literature and should be discouraged. There are no clinical data to support the use of chasteberry for reducing sexual desire, which has been a traditional application. Chasteberry is well tolerated; reported adverse effects are minor and may include gastrointestinal complaints, dizziness, and dry mouth. No herb-drug interactions have been reported, but caution is advised for its concomitant use with dopamine agonists or antagonists. Optimal standardization and dosing recommendations await clarification in clinical studies.                                                                              Precautions Specific: Not for use in pregnancy except under the supervision of a qualified healthcare practitioner. General: We recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications. For educational purposes only This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Moon Tincture

$24.00Price

    The statements made regarding these products have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The efficacy of these products has not been confirmed by FDA-approved research. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. All information presented here is not meant as a substitute for or alternative to information from healthcare practitioners. Please consult your healthcare professional about potential interactions or other possible complications before using any product. The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act requires this notice.